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'We must encourage an open dialogue and build on that for a brighter future'

Oct. 23, 2013

Marvin Lynn, dean of the School of Education at IU South Bend, will be the keynote speaker at two conferences in the upcoming week.

Marvin Lynn, dean of the School of Education at IU South Bend, will be the keynote speaker at two conferences in the upcoming week.

Marvin Lynn, dean of the School of Education at IU South Bend, will be the keynote speaker at social justice colloquium in Africa and at the American Educational Studies Association Annual Conference in Baltimore, Md., in the upcoming week. | Photo By Peter Ringenberg

He will speak about sustainable learning environments and will take part in a social justice colloquium at the University of the Free State in Bloemfontein, South Africa, on Oct. 29. His topic will be “Critical Race Theory and Education: Implications for a Pedagogy for Global Transformation.”

In this talk, Lynn, an expert on race and pedagogy, will discuss how educational research on race might facilitate increased global understanding about the world and how people can continue to work together to improve society.

Drawing upon widely publicized recent examples of racial discrimination in the U.S. and Europe, he argues that schools must help students become literate in matters of race so they can work effectively with others in an increasingly globalized marketplace.

“By examining the issues of race, we can build a more sustainable community,” Lynn said.

On Nov. 1, Lynn will deliver the R. Freeman Butts Lecture at the American Educational Studies Association Annual Conference in Baltimore, Md.

His speech is titled “On Behalf of Black Men: Constructing and Practicing Pedagogies of Resistance in a Post-Racial Age.”

In this talk, Lynn, who has examined the experiences of African American male teachers and students, draws upon his research to examine how and why people must resist the anti-intellectual media-driven push to judge people based on race, class and gender distinctions. Teachers must teach students to resist these forces and instead act as agents of a true democracy, where citizens actively engage in an exchange of diverse ideas about how to make the world a better place.

“We must encourage an open dialogue and build on that for a brighter future,” Lynn said. 

The lecture is named for education historian and philosopher R. Freeman Butts, an emeritus faculty member of Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, who died in 2010 at the age of 99.

Butts proposed an integrative approach to the study of education and its interaction with cultural and social conditions and wrote several classics in the study of education, including "The College Charts Its Course" (1939, reprinted 1971), "A History of Education in American Culture" (with Lawrence Cremin, 1953) and "A Cultural History of Western Education" (1955).

During the late 1970s, the American Educational Studies Association established the R. Freeman Butts Lecture, a prestigious scholarly lecture delivered at the AESA annual conference and published in the scholarly journal, Educational Studies.

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